From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

And here are also some gorgeous picture by photographer Dietmar Denger from group 1:


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

After what has seemed like a very short time in the mountains over the last two weeks the third and last team all arrived safely back in Bishkek late on Saturday afternoon (27 August). Perhaps the time has passed quickly due to the amount of work we had to do. There were 12 camera traps set out in the field and we set several more during the first few days. All these needed to be gathered back in and their many thousands of photographs monitored and sifted for signs of snow leopard or prey species, a task that consumes time. We also had many other objectives that we had to squeeze into the time we had, more on those in just a moment. We’ve had quite a bit of rain, hail and snow, but nothing like as bad as what the first team had to endure. The weather during this third group has been much colder, though, with frequent hard frosts in the mornings.

So here is an account of our last couple of weeks in the field with group three:

After writing up the expedition dairy last Sunday morning (14 August), I then spent the whole day shopping for expedition food with Emma. We loaded up two cars full of food ready for departure in the morning.

And at 8:00 am on Monday (15 August), team 3 all met-up at the Futuro hotel. The team consists of Hunter (USA) for his second slot, Nigel (Belgium), Trevor (UK), Tristan and her grandparents Mary and David (Canada), Manuela (Germany), Laura and Nicola (UK) who both participated in the Altai expedition several years ago, Kenny (USA/Hong Kong), Deborah (Germany/Netherlands), Miyana (Japan), and Rahat our placement from Kyrgyzstan joining for her second slot. Of the expedition crew only Bekbolot, Shailoo, Emma and myself met up at the hotel, Volodya stayed at base camp.

Team 3
Team 3
The convoy drive over the Karakol pass
The convoy drive over the Karakol pass

As team 2 arrived and left the mountains via two different routes, I thought it a good idea for team 3 to do the same. That way everyone gets to see more of this astonishing and stunningly beautiful country, and as we were going to have to drive the truck out through the tunnel (as it would have been too dangerous to drive it over the pass), I chose to drive team 3 in via the Kochkor/Karakol pass route. The route is longer than the tunnel route, but the roads are much better for driving. Hunter is now quite proficient at negotiating traffic on these manic roads, so he drove the whole way. David volunteered to be the fourth driver, and he displayed his years of experience of driving to get us all safely to base camp, where Volodya was waiting with a huge pot of hot Ukrainian borsch that he’d made for everyone.

The 2016 base camp in the upper part of the valley
The 2016 base camp in the upper part of the valley

The training sessions began right after dinner on Monday with a risk assessment talk. The whole of Tuesday (16 August) was spent with training sessions as well, starting with the scientist’s talk about the background of research, study animals and their prey, 2015 results, recommendations and aims for 2016. Everyone learned how to use the research equipment.

First survey
First survey

On the first survey day on Wednesday (17 August) the whole group went to Kashka-tor for practicing their newly-learnt skills. Unfortunately there was very little to record in the lower parts of the valley. The group then split with Nigel, Miyana, Tris and Phil climbing up one side valley with Volodya and the rest heading further up the valley with Shailoo and Bekbolot, where they split again to recover the camera traps. One trap could not be found. Nobody saw a great deal that day except for Volodya’s group who investigated the area where we had discovered leopard scat the previous Thursday. It had rained heavily the day before and a little more during the night, so when we found fresh snow leopard tracks (lots of them), we knew that these were only laid down that same morning! There were plenty old leopard tracks too along with ibex tracks. This is probably the best opportunity we have to capture snow leopard on camera trap, so we set three of them there before getting rather wet on the way back down. That place is quite special with huge cliffs on each side of the glacier. It is so easy to imagine leopards up there looking down on us.

Fresh snow leopard footprints
Fresh snow leopard footprints
Nikki setting a camera trap
Nikki setting a camera trap

As we were all wet and cold after our day in the rain, we lit the yurt fire to warm ourselves up again.

On Thursday (18 August) the team split into three groups: Two groups headed off to Chon-chikan, the one walking up the left of the valley consisting of Manuela, Nikki, Nigel and Bekbolot saw a red fox and two eagles. The team that headed up the right, which consisted of David, Miyana, Kenny and Volodya saw a white-winged redstart. The third group – Mary, Tris, Laura, Deborah and Trevor headed off to Kosh-tor to recover traps and saw an eagle and marmot.

Miyana and Nikki clearly had too much energy after the day's hike
Miyana and Nikki clearly had too much energy after the day’s hike

The wildlife is now scarcer down in the valleys compared with previous slots. Most noticeable is the absence of small birds and butterflies now that the spring nesting has ended and the flowers are all but gone.

Hunter winning a game of Kok-boru
Hunter winning a game of Kok-boru

We took a day off from surveys on Friday (19 August) to watch a game of Kok-boru, which was to take place right beside our base camp. This was not a big game such as we had witnessed during the previous slot, rather a small game with just a few participants. They also included various other games such as arm-wrestling on horseback. Hunter played a few one-on-one games of Kok-boru with the boy from the neighbouring yurt and he won most of them. I have to say that Hunter really looks quite professional playing this game now, a potential future Californian professional player, he looked good partly due to having a fast horse this time around. Several people had a horse-ride for a while including Kenny and Deborah, but only Miyana and Tris rode horses all day long. We were later invited over to the neighbour’s for a meal.

Kenny
Kenny
Deborah
Deborah
Miyana and Tristan
Miyana and Tristan

On Saturday (20 August) the whole team headed out to the Issik-ata valley, passing playful and watchful marmots on the way.

Deborah scanning the ridges for Ibex
Deborah scanning the ridges for ibex

On Sunday (21 August) Nikki, Deborah and Laura put in a special effort to get another couple of transects covered, while everybody else other than David and Mary headed off to the NABU snow leopard rehabilitation centre at Issyk-kul lake, where we would spend the night. We took our time getting there and it was too dark to see the cats that evening, but we all got some pretty good views the following morning prior to heading off back to base camp on Monday (22 August). While we were away, David repaired some of the camp tools and tents, while Mary put in some hard work cleaning and tidying the camp.

Hard expedition life! Miyana and Tris got soaked to the skin in Issyk-kul lake
Hard expedition life! Miyana and Tris got soaked to the skin in Issyk-kul lake
The NABU rehabilitation centre
The NABU rehabilitation centre
Young snow leopard
Young snow leopard
Lynx
Lynx

Surveys conducted on Tuesday (23 August) revealed very little, mainly due to bad weather. A strong wind hit the camp and we had to hold onto everything to stop the camp being blown away. I found a noctule bat lying cold in the grass so we moved it to a warm dark place in the yurt, and later that evening it had gained enough strength to fly away.

I tried to photograph these petroglyphs of Ibex but Nigel decided to sit on them
I tried to photograph these petroglyphs of Ibex but Nigel decided to sit on them

We split up into two groups on Wednesd (24 August). An all-female group headed off to Dungarama where they managed to see a stoat, an eagle, a lammergeier, an ibex and a wolf scat. Volodya, Phil, Nigel and Hunter hiked in Pitiy, where they were not so successful, but they did see the first swallowtail butterfly of the expedition.

Trevor collecting a camera trap
Trevor collecting a camera trap

Thursday (25 August) was the big day where we all returned to Kaska-tor, the place where we had found snow leopard footprints, scrape and scat previously, and where we had set the three camera traps on 17 August. The party consisted of Phil, Hunter, Miyana, Tris, Manuela, Trevor, Niki and Laura, and this was our very last survey day with the objective of collecting those last three traps. We had high hopes that these traps were going to capture active snow leopards, but on arrival we could not find any fresh footprints, so there was much disappointment. But also on arrival, sitting on the rocks behind the cameras, was a lammergeier, which immediately took flight over our heads. A vulture sitting there like that suggested there was a carcass there somewhere. We collected in the cameras, then after lunch a few of us explored the area and Miyana discovered the remains of an ibex, which we could clearly see had been killed by a snow leopard. Typically, a snow leopard will leave the nasal passage and eye-sockets of the prey intact, in contrast to other predators such as the wolf for example. We also saw a Saker falcon flying over the camp upon our return that day.

Ibex killed by a snow leopard
Ibex killed by a snow leopard

Other parts of the team also conducted interviews with some of the herders in the yurts further down the valley. An interesting pattern of responses from herders is the opinion that snow leopards only suck the blood of animals. The origins of this myth are probably based on the fact that a leopard caught with a fresh kill will be holding the animal by the throat before it is scared off. One herder actually said that the meat from an animal killed by a leopard is white after the leopard has sucked all the blood out.

And then, back at base, when we thought our chance to capture a snow leopard had gone, there it was after all! A rather poor quality, but nevertheless very great reward for all our efforts over the years, honing in on the ghost of the mountain, until we have finally caught it on camera! So the ghost does exist and roams these hills.

Rather poor quality, but the very first snow leopard captured on our camera traps
Rather poor quality, but the very first snow leopard captured on our camera traps

 

Mary, Kenny, David, Hunter and Volodya
Mary, Kenny, David, Hunter and Volodya

With a spring in our step and hearts full of pride, we disassembled the yurt and much of camp on Friday (26 August) and packed it all away in the truck, ready for departure Saturday morning. Thank you to everyone for helping with this so much.

Trevor, Nigel, Miyana, Laura and Nicola taking down the yurt
Trevor, Nigel, Miyana, Laura and Nicola taking down the yurt
Manuela reluctantly packing up to leave on the very last day in this beautiful valley
Manuela reluctantly packing up to leave on the very last day in this beautiful valley

All together this has been the most successful year ever here in the Tien Shan. But this is no coincidence as each year has built on the other. The results of interviews with the herders and the surveys during the first year identified suitable snow leopard habitats. In the second year, a snow leopard distribution model was defined based on the data collected and a plan was made to hone in on the ghost of the mountain. And finally this year those places identified by the model were targeted to culminate in definite proof of snow leopards roaming these hills. Well done to everyone who has made this possible over the years!

Thank you for all your hard work! All of you over the years have contributed to this success and you can feel justifiably proud. Team 3, have a safe flight home, and I hope to meet you all again someday.

Best wishes to you all and thank you again.

Phil

========

Quick summary group 3

Snow leopard captured on a camera trap (photo and video) for the first time on a Biosphere Expeditions Tien Shan expedition; a fresh leopard kill, which shows a very clear pattern and example worthy of publication of how snow leopards eat their prey; and many clearly defined leopard footprints found.

Slot 3 added five new species of birds to the list of 57 compiled by the previous slots; one new swallowtail butterfly observed in the mountains.

13 cells covered, compared to 16 cells covered by group 2. This reduction is due to the large number of camera traps that needed to be recovered during the last slot.


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

Hello everybody, I’m Phil, the expedition leader for slots 2 and 3. Sorry we can’t update this dairy more regularly but we can only do this when we come down out of the mountains and back to civilisation.

Well, at 8:00 am on Monday 1st August team 2 all met up at the Futuro hotel. The team consists of Hunter (USA), Gerald (USA), Roland (Germany), Neil (UK), Jake (USA), Fedor (Netherlands), John (UK), Ray (UK), Starr (USA), Bernd (Germany), Fiona (Austria), Ruth (Australia), and Rahat our placement from Kyrgyzstan, joining us for the second year in a row. Of the expedition crew only Bekbolot and myself met-up at the hotel; Volodya, Shailoo, Ismail and Emma stayed at the base camp after we’d spent the last two days setting it all up in preparation for the team to arrive.

Team 2
Team 2

The six-hour convoy drive to base-camp was easy-going and pretty uneventful, but for the fact that we saw two wolves in broad daylight in the lower part of the valley. They were running flat-out in a straight line one behind the other in the typical way that wolves travel. They ran over the rolling foothills at the lower reaches of the valley and we watched them run off into the distance up towards the higher mountains. Seeing this made Gerry ecstatic as he loves everything about wolves.

Convoy to base
Convoy to base

Amadeus, the butterfly expert and placement from the first team visited us at base camp to explain how to use the butterfly app, he went on his way the following day. A quick message to team 3 – please if you haven’t yet done so, download the ‘Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan’ app., from www.discovernature.org.kg (Android version only) before you arrive. You won’t be able to download it after you’re in the mountains.

The training sessions began right after dinner on Monday with our risk assessment talk. The whole of Tuesday was spent with training sessions as well, starting with the scientist’s talk about the background of research, study animals and their prey, 2015 results, recommendations and aims for 2016. Everyone learned how to use the research equipment.

The weather has been great! We had a little rain on both Thursdays but it’s generally been sunny every day.

On the first survey day on Wednesday (3 August) the whole group went to the Tuyuk-Choloktor valley for practicing their newly-learnt skills. Unfortunately there was very little to record. The group then split into two with half climbing up one side valley with Volodya, and the rest headed up the next valley with Shailoo. During lunchtime Volodya’s group emerged over the distant ridge and waved manically at the second group, who were at the time preoccupied with the two pairs of huge Ibex horns that Gerry and Ismail had found. Gerry then insisted that he carry the really heavy horns back to base to show everyone. I think after only a little walking he wished that he hadn’t, still he persevered and managed to carry them all the way down the mountain.

Gerry and ibex horns
Gerry and ibex horns

On Thursday (4 August) the team split into two groups. One group consisting of Shailoo, Phil, Ray, Ruth, John, Neil, Jake and Rahat walked up Sary-kol and conducted a fascinating interview with a sheep herder. He said that on 6 August last year he witnessed two snow leopards eating two of his lambs, he described them as blood-suckers based on the way they had hold of the lambs by the throat. He also said that over the 40 years he’s been coming to this part of the valley he’s seen about 15 snow leopards. The other group consisting of everybody else hiked up Issyk-Ata to retrieve the two camera traps the first team had set at the foot of the moraine near the footprints in the snow where we thought the snow leopard might cross the river, and the other trap that we set observing the wider field. Neither trap produced snow leopard, but the one set on the moraine showed a badger crossing, and both traps had several hundred pictures of horses until the horses knocked both traps over. Four ibex were spotted by the Issyk-Ata group who hiked right up to the top of the pass, as well as two large falcons, which we now think to be Saker falcons.

We heard rumour that the next day (Friday, 3 August) there was to be a game of Kok-boru a little further down the valley where we’d had our base camp during previous years. Kok-boru is the horseback game played by the herders in the valley where they carry the headless goat and drop it in the goal. This was the real game where the upper valley competes against the lower valley, a serious event where 30 players give it all they’ve got to win. The name “Kok-boru” means blue wolf and in ancient times they played with a headless wolf.

So on Friday (3 August) we took a day off and travelled down to watch the game. There was a little practice going on prior to the main event and Roland, Hunter, Fedor and Gerry didn’t hesitate to saddle-up and give it a try. The goat normally weighs about 20 kg, but on this occasion the upper-valley herders, who get to eat the goat if they win chose the largest goat available, and this one weighed over 30 kg. Our boys could hardly lift it one-handed, and it made for a very tiring yet thoroughly entertaining game. The team of Roland and Hunter won to great celebration and cheers.

Roland, Hunter, John, Fedor (left to right)
Roland, Hunter, John, Fedor (left to right)

The main event involved all the herders (not including our boys) and the goals were way up and way down the valley. Prior to this they all lined-up on horseback before us displaying their courage and bravery and paid a touching display of honour and respect to us all, a rare true mark of respect. Volodya was really very touched by this.

Within minutes all the riders had disappeared over the horizon up the valley, after a long wait we decided to drive up to see what was going on. We found them right beside our base camp still fighting hard. The game was eventually won by the upper valley.

On Saturday (6 August) we split into two teams, Volodya and Phil leading (9 people) in Kara-Tor, the first valley over the pass. And Shailoo leading a smaller group in Chon-Chikan, who of course saw the many petroglyphs that are in that valley, but none of the study species other than marmot. They had hopes of retrieving the two camera traps that the first team had set there, but they forgot to take the coordinates, John made a rather funny report saying “Anybody could have had them, nobody thought to ask if anybody had them, everybody thought somebody would have them, but in-fact nobody had them”. It didn’t really matter as they have plenty of battery power left to be collected by team three. They did see a fox though. I should also mention that John was not impressed by Volodya’s description of Chon-Chikan being a flat walk all the way up, John said “It started off with a steep bit, followed by a steep bit in the middle, and the end was steep”. The Kara-Tor group had more success, seeing many marmot, 15 ibex, an eagle and lammergeier. In fact we have seen lammergeier every day so far.

Lammergeier
Lammergeier

Sunday (7 August) was our day off and we were the guests of our neighbour “Talant”. In his yurt, where we sampled the excellent food prepared by Guelcan, his wife. After dinner several people – Jake, Hunter, Ruth, Star, Roland, Gerry and Fedor borrowed horses and spent the afternoon riding around.

Monday (8 August) we split into three groups. There was a group (Fedor, Gerry, Roland, Bernd, Hunter, Bekbalot and Rahat) who were keen to explore a high ridge, so they set off on foot and climbed to well over 4100 m, where they found snowcock and wolf scats. Another group went with Volodya back to set another camera trap. The third group walked into Dungurama, which translates as “noisy valley” aptly named as there are falling rocks every few minutes. This group found an old argali sheep scull with horns. It appears argali were once found throughout our study site, but these days they are largely absent, probably hunted to near local extinction.

Jake and argali skull
Jake and argali skull

Most of the team were keen to do an overnighter and they wanted it to be as challenging as possible, Volodya made mention of a valley within the study area that was so remote that it had not yet been explored. I think Volodya wished he hadn’t suggested it after finding out how difficult it would be on Tuesday (9 August). We obviously had to carry everything in with us, some carrying tents and stoves. A 15 km hike in to 3600 m under a hot punishing sun. We made camp by a small lake by the glacier. We saw no signs of snow leopard or ibex, but we saw some snowcock. The next morning after a surprisingly good sleep in our bivi-bags some of the lads – Fedor, Gerry and Bekbolot climbed up to the saddle in the ridge but could not see Bishkek despite being much closer to there than we were to base camp. The hike back down to the cars turned out to be a race to stay ahead of the rain, all of us getting a little wet. Getting back to the cars was nowhere near the end of this story – the cars were 1 hour from base camp and the gear leaver on one of the cars (the one blocking the other) had seized up and we couldn’t move it. After a tricky manoeuvre on the hillside to bypass the stricken car with the other, we placed the transfer box leaver to neutral to tow the stricken car backwards back down to the main valley road where we left it. We then needed two trips to get everyone back to base. Three hours later and in the dark we managed to get a bite to eat provided by a very concerned Emma. Meanwhile, we learned that Ray, who had been suffering from a bad knee, and who was one of the few who had stayed at base camp had decided to call it a day and had headed off back to Bishkek, apologising to all that he had to and wishing us all the best success with the rest of the expedition. Thanks for all your hard work Ray! Sorry I wasn’t there to say goodbye.

As Ray and Shailoo drove over the pass on the way out on Wednesday (10 August) they were lucky enough to see two argali sheep run across the track in front of the car. This, together with the scull we found the other day is the only evidence we’ve had for three years that argali are here in the valley.

Fedor setting a camera trap
Fedor setting a camera trap

On Thursday (11 August) Gerry, Roland, Bernd, and Fedor with much excitement discovered what appears to be the very first snow leopard scat ever found in the valley!

Friday (12 August) was our last field work day. We set off back along Issyk-Ata in a large group of 15 people. The objective being to try and study the Alamedin pass area, which is usually bypassed. Only Gerry, Brend and Fedor managed to find the route over there, everyone else stayed on the usual track.

Conclusion

Snow leopard tracks found again, and the very first scrape and scat ever found. Three separate sightings of ibex compared to the many sightings made by the first team. This follows the normal observed pattern of them moving to the higher reaches of the mountains as more herders move up the valleys. All findings fitting nicely to the distribution model built over the previous two years.  We have 12 camera traps set out in the field, all to be collected by the third team. The previous slot covered more cells (22) compared to this (16), but these were generally higher and more difficult to cover. Also a difficult overnighter to study an area Volodya has been longing to investigate and finally ten new bird species added to the primary list of 42 compiled by the first team, including sightings of snowcock by the team working at higher altitudes.

Thanks for all your hard work! You really have been quite a remarkable team and a huge pleasure for us to work with. Safe travel home, and I hope to meet you all again someday. Ready to go team 3?


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

Phil, Bekbolot, Shailoo, Ismail, Emma and Volodya are on their way to Karakol valley, two cars packed with food and other supplies. They will be setting up base camp for slot 2 and return on Sunday to Bishkek. Writing this, I am at the Futuro hotel waiting for two more expedition vehicles to be delivered and preparing to leave on Sunday morning.

After a lovely last night dinner on Saturday (21 July) with slot 1 at Supara restaurant located a few kilometres outside of Bishkek Bekbolot, Volodya, Phil & I went to Ala Archa National Park for a day visit on Tuesday (26 July). What was supposed to be a short, easy walk turned out to be a 9 km hike up to a waterfall with spectacular views on the way. The entrance to the National Park is only about 25 km from the city center of Bishkek and is worth a visit if you have some spare time.

Ala Archa National Park
Ala Archa National Park

 

On Wednesday Phil and I, accompanied by Ismail, went to Ananyevo at Issyk Kol lake for a visit of the NABU rehabilitation centre. Three snow leopards, a lynx, three golden eagles and a black kite are currently hosted there. The centre is located in a remote place in the mountains. Buildings include a wooden hut – the ranger’s home – a few stables, enclosures and a tiny stone house for staff and guests sleeping over (which does not happen often as the centre is not open to the public). For some of the animals it is a temporary home to recover from injuries (such as the Pallas’ cat that was released back into the wild two weeks ago). For others, such as the snow leopard Alsu who has lost a paw from being trapped in a foot snare, it has become a permanent residence.

Alsu
Alsu
Golden eagle
Golden eagle
The centre
The centre
The centre
The centre

 

We went along with the ranger feeding the animals early in the morning on Thursday (28 July), had ‘chay’ (tea) at his hut and arrived back in Bishkek after a five hour drive in the early afternoon.

Friday (29 July) was our shopping day. Emma, Volodya, Phil and I very efficiently tasked shared at Frunze supermarket: Filling two baskets at a time (Emma & I) paying & loading the car (Phil & Volodya) while the next baskets were being filled. We were done in under four hours! 😉

So, now it is time form me to say goodbye. Thank you again to everyone who has contributed and helped to make this expedition happen. It has been a great pleasure to be out in the field with team 1 and also to continue working on the ground together with the NABU staff. Thanks for your hospitality, support and good humour!

Dawai teams 2 & 3 – I hope you’ll enjoy your time in the Tien Shan as much as I have. May the sun shine for you for the next four weeks!

All the best

Malika


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

After two challenging weeks in the Tien Shan mountains team 1 arrived safely back in Bishkek last Saturday in the late afternoon. We were all happy to escape the bad mountain weather including thunderstorms, wind, rain and snow, but at the same time felt sad that we had to leave the truly stunning mountains. Luckily the sun came out when we broke down base camp in the morning, so that we didn’t have to wear rain gear for the team picture. Driving up and over the Karakol pass to Kochkor everybody got a final glimpse of peaks and glaciers covered in fresh snow.

Team 1
Team 1

But let me start this report at the very beginning on, 11 July. We arrived at base that Monday afternoon after seven hours of convoy-driving from Bishkek via Kara Balta, the tunnel and Suusamyr. While everyone was moving into their tents, Emma immediately got busy in the kitchen tent.

The first team consisted of Michael (Germany), Carola (Germany), Amanda (Australia) and Dietmar (journalist, Germany), Volodya, the expedition scientist and old hand of our snow leopard conservation project from the very beginning in the Altai mountains of Russia more than a decade ago, Aman & Bekbolot, members of the NABU Gruppa Bars (snow leopard patrol), the team’s mountain guides, camera trap & tracking experts, Emma, master of the kitchen in her third year, as well as four placements: Machabbat (NABU), Ismail and Aigerim helping with translations – or,  if you like, bridging cultures – and finally, Amadeus, butterfly expert joining the expedition for the second time, also as a placement.

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The training sessions began right after dinner on Monday with a risk assessment talk by the expedition leader. The whole of Tuesday was spent with training sessions as well, starting with the scientist’s talk about the background of research, study animals and their prey, 2015 results, recommendations and aims for 2016. Everyone learned how to use the research equipment such as GPS, compass, map, etc., how to fill in datasheets, what to take on the survey walks, what the safety procedures are and how a PLB (personal locator beacon) can be used in case of an emergency. To give everyone’s mind a rest, the yurt was set up in between theoretical lessons.

Training day
Training day
Setting up the yurt
Setting up the yurt

On the first survey day on Wednesday the whole group went to Chon Chikan valley for practicing the newly-learnt skills and collecting four camera traps that were set up by NABU staff in the beginning of June. I would call it a perfect showcase training day: The sun was shining when we started off at an altitude of about 3,000 m, a couple of hours later and further up we were hit by hale and rain forcing us into rain gear, hats & gloves – as if the risk assessment had come to life: ‘Rapid change of weather is a high risk in high mountain environment”…

First survey day
First survey day

But the day was not only successful in these terms. Two ibex were spotted on top of a ridge by Aman, just when most of the team had sore legs sore and short breaths. This very exciting and satisfying moment made our day. Apart from the ibex, fox and marmot tracks were found and all four camera traps were collected. The traps had taken hundreds of pictures, some quite nice ibex and bird shots, but no snow leopard.

Ibex
Ibex
Camera trap picture
Camera trap picture

On Thursday (14 July) this year’s first set of snow leopard tracks was found in Issyk-Ata valley. And we found a second track the next day at Kashka-Tor and even a third track a week later on the last survey day at Don Galamish! Most excitingly the locations are quite some distance apart from each other. Camera traps were set in all locations, in Issyk-Ata one of them facing the end of the glacier morane has been set to field mode taking a picture every 30 minutes. Team two: You’ll be the ones collecting them! Evidence of ibex (scat & tracks) were found in all valleys, so there is a good chance that the snow leopard is around too.

Snow leopard tracks
Snow leopard tracks

On Saturday (16 July) the whole team attended a very special event: The release of a Pallas’ cat into the wild. A boy found it in very poor condition about a month ago near his family’s yurt close to the village of Doeng Alysh in East Karakol. It was taken to the NABU rehabilitation centre by the Gruppa Bars to be cared for and nursed back to strenght. We arranged a meeting point in Doeng Alysh with the NABU people bringing in the cat, but had to overcome an obstacle first: Some part of the pass road was still blocked by snow and ice. Using a pick and shovels, the male part of the team cleared the road and basically opened the only Eastern/Western Karakol connection for everyone else, including herders and their livestock.

Clearing Karakol pass
Clearing Karakol pass

Apart from our team, quite a few local press people were present, as well as neighbouring herders and their families, a great number of NABU staff handing out educational material and giving a talk to the local people. Apart from being able to see a truly wild Pallas’ cat, it was great to witness NABU’s important work on the ground.

Pallas cat
Pallas cat
Release (c) Dietmar Denger
Release (c) Dietmar Denger

Emma gave us a look of reproach when we arrived at camp late. But we made her happy again by emptying the large pot of delicious soup she had cooked for us. Sunday (17 July) was our day off. Aman and Bekbolot had organised a traditional Kyrgyz horse game for the next day. The ‘playball’ is a dead goat, head and feet cut off (I agree, it sounds terrible). Placed in the middle of the playground, the goat must be picked up and laid down in a marked area. Doesn’t sound that difficult, but the players are on horseback and the goat weighs about 20 kg! Between rivaling valleys the game is a serious clash – luckily the players we saw were all friends. We were also invited to ride their horses – some of us did – but only Michael was brave enough to to try to lift up the goat from the ground. Although the operation failed, it was great fun for the rest of us watching the show.

Horse game
Horse game
Horse game
Horse game

Next we were the guests of our “neighbour” Talant. In his yurt, we chatted with Guelcan, his wife, and tried her Borsok – fresh, homemade bread and sour cream. Thanks to our local team members, we learned a lot about Kyrgyz customs and traditions.

Back to research work on Monday (18 July), two teams surveyed Chon Chikan valley and set four camera traps in different locations at an altitude of around 3,750 m. It was raining most of the afternoon and when we came back to camp the wind had picked up in such a way that the toilet & shower tents had fallen over. We found Carola and Phil, who had stayed behind, in the mess tent, both retaining it from being blown away. Equipment, books and other items stored on benches & tables along the sides were on the ground. The yurt was crushed on one side and out of balance. Rubbish bins, buckets and other small camp equipment were scattered all over the place. What a mess! It was a great relief when the wind finally calmed down an hour or so later and the clearing up could start.

Wonky yurt
Wonky yurt

Making use of the newly opened pass road, we went to Donguruma and Pitiy valley in East Karakol on Tuesday. From last year’s results these valleys seemed to be promising spots. Fresh tracks and scat of ibex and snow cock were found in Donguruma, no sightings, though. Aman, Aigerim, Michael & I heard and saw marmot and found some interesting petroglyphs on the way displaying hunting scenes. Apart from the core research of snow leopard and their prey, we have been collecting data on petroglyphs, butterflies and birds using a smartphone app that was developed and created by Amedeus in collaboration with his partners. Having used pen & paper in 2015 to help creating a database that includes a species list with pictures for identification, smartphones were taken out this year for extensive field testing. So far it has worked very well and smartphone data collection is to be continued over slots 2 & 3 and the final results will be included in the expedition report.

The Pitiy team was very successful: A group of eight (!) ibex including young ones was spotted. Thank you, Phil, for carrying your long lense the whole day so that the exceptional sighting can now be shared with everyone.

Ibex
Ibex

More camera traps were set on Wednesday (20 July) and two teams walked from base to explore a short but quite steep valley just opposite. Rain poured down from midday on, so that all teams returned back to base early in the afternoon, the datasheets pretty empty. A fire in the stove was lit quickly, the washing lines in the yurt closely packed with dripping clothes. Around the stove two circles were built: the inner one consisting of walking boots, the outer one, very close by, where the girls stretched out their hands & feet towards the warmth of the fire. This was when I first saw Machabbat putting her feet into socks and plastic bags before putting on her sandals… or was it a couple of days ago?

Walking to base
Walking to base

It continued raining for most of the night, but stopped Thursday morning (21 July) when we left base for our last survey day. Tuyuk – the valley where base camp 1 was located in 2015 – and Don Galamish, the next valley leading to the same ridge only from the other side, were Thursday’s survey tasks. Both teams arrived at their side of the ridge around lunchtime when heavy rain and thunder literally washed away hopes of beautiful views and exploring the surroundings. The Tuyuk team turned around to get out of the danger zone, in Don Galamish the team sought some shelter under rocks while Aman & Bekbolot climbed a bit further to collect a camera trap. That was when snow leopard tracks were found again, this time in the mud.

We were wondering by now whether it could get any wetter? My boss Matthias would say: “Skin is waterproof.” I’d say Yes: Wet AND cold! 😉 The Tuyuk group consisting of Volodya, wearing his shorts as usual, and Aigerim, Amanda, Carola and myself got as wet as you can get, but the girls also got as cold you can get. We sat in the car for a short while, struggling to open our lunch boxes with fingers stiff and numb. In our wet clothes even one hour of maximum heating on the drive back couldn’t make us stop shivering. Only a couple of hours around the scorching hot stove in the yurt made us come sort of back to normal.

But Thursday wasn’t just our last survey day, it was also Michael’s birthday! While we were out in the field Machabbat and Emma did a great job decorating the mess tent and preparing a special dinner for celebrations.

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The table was stuffed with nicely decorated starters, hot soup and a delicious chocolate cake. Showing foresight, Michael brought a bottle of vodka, so we all had to have a shot. I don’t remember whose idea it was, but everyone was then supposed to sing a song representing their country of origin – great fun! ϑ

On Friday (22 July) morning two teams each accompanied by a translator went out to interview local people. Seven yurts were visited in total, the teams were warmly welcomed, hosted and fed and came back with a lot of interesting information. Most surprisingly it was mentioned on several occasions that foreign countries shouldn’t be allowed to sell weapons to Kyrgyz people. No weapons, no poaching, no more threats to snow leopards. If only saving the snow leopard would be that easy…

After reviewing the interview datasheets, Volodya gave us a summary of what has been achieved during the first slot: Biologial results were found in 22 cells – a great result considering that we were a relatively small team going out in two groups. Most important were the findings of three snow leopard tracks in different locations. Nine camera traps, set by NABU staff in cells of high possibilities were checked and retrieved, ten cameras were installed in new places. As to the most important prey species, six direct observations of ibex were made. As regards the locations, the sightings fit into the model built in last year’s report. An comprehensive bird list has also been created during the first two weeks: 42 different species in total including seven bird of prey as indicator of habitat quality (53 different bird species were recorded during all slots in 2015.)

Long-legged buzzard
Long-legged buzzard

Directed by Amadeus, fourteen different butterfly species were recorded along the way (a total of 20 in 2015), four burial mounds and over 50 different petroglyphs, four of which include humans, camels, horses and red deer. Most commonly displayed are ibex and snow leopard.

Petroglyph
Petroglyph

Many more anecdotes could be told, but I have to come to an end. Thank you everyone for contributing to a very successful first slot in many ways. You’ve done a great job coping with altitude, steep terrain, wind, rain and snow. But most importantly I want to thank you for your enthusiasm, high spirits and openness to new experience and other cultures. I hope you got as much out of the expedition as you have put in!

Whiteboard
Whiteboard

I’ll be in touch again in a couple of days with some more preparational info for slot 2 before saying goodbye and handing over to Phil.


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

It was after midnight when we arrived back in Bishkek this Sunday morning.

When we left on Friday, we did not expect the unexpected when driving up the mountain pass road well in time according to the timetable set for preparing base camp. Road construction work was going on in the darkness of the tunnel, so it was closed for trucks, including ours!

Loaded truck
Loaded truck
Roadworks
Roadworks

Phil, Volodya, Emma, Isma & I passed in one of the expedition cars while Aman and Bekbolot stayed back in the truck on the other side. No information could be gained about how long the temporarily closure would last. So we just sat and waited, and waited, and waited, watching dozens of trucks piling up in front of us probably half way down the pass road. Four hours later, at 18:00, the worker’s finishing time, finally the orange & white NABU truck appeared out of the dark of the tunnel!

We drove on in convoy until about half past eight until we reached the place of a herder friend of ours, where we pitched a few tents for spending the night in.

In convoy
In convoy
Fuelling up
Fuelling up
Traffic jam
Traffic jam
Stopping overnight by the herder's yurt
Stopping overnight by the herder’s yurt

But we did not go to sleep before having a very basic but good dinner.

Dinner
Dinner

After another three-hour drive on Saturday, we reached last year’s base camp location and finally we scouted out a beautiful location close to Talant’s (another herder friend) yurt, about two km further up the Karakol Pass. The spot is at an altitude of 2,950 m and beside a stream supplying us with water and the opportunity for a very refreshing bath for the very brave. You may feel some shortness of breath when arriving, but don’t worry, we will take it slowly, and although altitude sickness can occur from 2,400 m onwards, medical evidence shows that it is not usually a problem below 3,500 m.

Base camp
Base camp
Unpacking at base
Unpacking at base

Talant and his family are good friends with the NABU staff and they have also been hosting expedition teams every year in their yurt for a traditional Kyrgyzs meal on the day off. Talant’s sons will also look after the camp during the week between slot 1 & 2, when everyone will go back to Bishkek.

I would not call base camp set-up a routine, but now in our third year, we are a well-oiled team. So the truck was quickly unloaded and the kitchen tent & cooker were set up first, so that Emma start weaving her magic in the kitchen. Because of the delay, we only had part of the day to set up and did so without allowing ourselves a break. By 18:00 base was set up sufficiently so that Phil, Aman, Emma & I could leave for another six hour drive back to Bishkek. Volodya, Bekbolot and Isma stayed back to finish setting up for our return on Monday. Team 1: We need lots of people to set up the yurt, so this will be our first activity after the long journey from Bishkek and before I’ll talk everyone through the risk assessment.

Whilst I write this, Phil has gone for some last minute shopping with Emma. It is sunny and warm in Bishkek and the 14 day weather forecast looks promising. The second expedition vehicle has just been delivered, I have printed some more paperwork such as a Russian translation of the interview datasheet, etc. and will finish up with office work today.

I hope you are as excited as we are, now that preparation is over and we are all ready to go! We are looking forward to meeting the first team tomorrow (Monday) morning at 08:00 at Futuro hotel.


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

 

We’re leaving Bishkek tomorrow morning to set up base camp. The truck is loaded with equipment such as the yurt, stove & wood, kitchen, mess, toilet & shower tents, cooking gear, gas bottles, fuel canisters, tables & benches and a great variety of other farily useful things. Today Emma, Volodya & Phil spent most of day shopping. An infinite loop of filling basket after basket, passing the cashier, loading the car and going straight back in for the next run. I stayed back at the NABU offices preparing paperwork and equipment.

Shopping
Shopping

The datasheets are printed, the GPSs set up and the scat collection kits made up (you will learn what that is during the training days).

Emma & Volodya loading up
Emma & Volodya loading up

Keep your fingers crossed that the truck won’t get stuck or drive into the ditch as it did last year! Aman, Phil & I will return to Bishkek on Saturday. I will let you have the latest news before the first team meets on Monday morning.

And finally, a word on the weather: It has been raining in Bishkek almost every day, but when the sun comes out it is pretty hot in the city. The south side of Ala-Too range, where our study site is, is less cloudy, but the temperatures will be much lower. Please be

prepared for both rain and sunshine (and snow can fall even in summer). Temperatures in the mountains can be anything from 5 to 25 degrees C, sometimes even dropping to freezing overnight. More first hand info when we are back from setting up.


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

Phil & I arrived in Bishkek on Sunday, where we were warmly welcomed by our partners on the ground at the NABU office and went straight to work. We fetched the expedition equipment, stored last year at the outskirts of Bishkek, together with Almaz and NABU staff. It was­ half a truck load of tents, the yurt, research and kitchen equipment, spare tyres and car boxes, water and fuel canisters, cookers, gas bottles, benches & tables, etc., etc.

truck at storage 3-7-16

In the afternoon we were invited to a meal with everyone.

NABU&BEstaff 3-7-16

Over the next couple of days we will be checking the equipment, writing shopping lists, going shopping for food and other supplies, and updating paperwork. Tomorrow will be the end of Ramadan, the Muslim fasting month, a public holiday of big celebration here in Kyrgyzstan. So we are hoping to find some Chinese shops open tomorrow morning, which means group 1 will be on Chinese food for a couple of weeks 😉

Volodya, our scientist, arrived this morning, completing the team. We had a meeting with Amadeus in the afternoon, talking through butterfly, birds & petroglyph data collection procedures using the newly created apps. Volodya was quite excited about how easy & quick data collection and processing could be, if modern technology does work out in the field. We will have old-fashioned pen & paper versions as back-ups too.

Tonight Emma kindly invited us to have dinner at her place. She cooked a delicious meal and made Phil & I eat an enormous amount of Tiramisu afterwards. In case any of you consider weight loss to be a possible side effect to the expedition, forget about it! 😉

Emma dinner 4-7-16


From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan 

From our snow leopard volunteering expedition in the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan (http://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/tienshan)

Hello everyone and welcome to the Tien Shan 2016 expedition diary!

My name is Malika and I will be your expedition leader on the first group together with Phil. Phil will then take over leading groups 2 & 3 of this year’s snow leopard conservation expedition to the Tien Shan mountains of Kyrgyzstan.

Malika Fettak
Malika Fettak
Phil Markey
Phil Markey

For the third time this Biosphere Expeditions project will be run in collaboration with NABU Kyrgyzstan and the ‘Gruppa Bars’ (snow leopard patrol), consisting of four Kyryzs NABU members of staff that work in snow leopard conservation all whole year round. Each group will be accompaigned by two Gruppa Bars members (and I’ll introduce you to everyone in due course). They will be our guides, mountain experts, spokespeople and link to the local herders.

Dr. Volodya Tytar, originally from the Ukraine, is the expedition scientist. He has been working on this snow leopard project for more than a decade from the very beginning in the Altai mountains of Russia, before the study site was moved to Kyrgyzstan in 2014. If you would like to read about last year’s results, the 2015 expedition report will be ready for downloading within the next few days. You’ll receive an e-mail notification soon! Older reports are on www.biosphere-expeditions.org/reports.

Dr. Volodya Tytar
Dr. Volodya Tytar

As in previous years, we will also have a couple of local placements on each group. They all have a specific interest in conservation, good knowledge of English and will help with communications in general and with conducting interviews at local herders’ yurts in particular.

So far so good. All staff involved are busy with organising things by e-mailing from our desks in Germany, the UK, Kiev and Bishkek, but we will all finally meet at the Bishkek NABU office on Sunday. So we will be about a week ahead of you, fetching base camp equipment from storage, checking and shopping for items that need to be replaced, buying supplies, etc. We will scout out a base camp location, set up camp, meet our cook Emma, shop for food (a lot) and make sure everything will be ready and in place for research work to commence when the first team arrives.

As regards the research work, have a look below, where methods and equipment are explained. The more you know now, the easier it will be for you during the first two training days, so do swot up, if you can. In addition to studying the dossier, have a look at the “Methods & equipment” playlist. The bits that are relevant to the expedition are first and foremost our cell survey methodology, followed by GPS, compass & map, Garmin etrex 20, PBLs, camera trapping and binoculars. Enjoy!

Finally, a word on some additional research we will be doing (that is not mentioned in the dossier): Amadeus, a local placement who joined the expedition in 2015, has created a ‘Butterflies of Kyrgyzstan’ app based on data that were collected last year. We will continue collecting butterfly data along the way on survey walks either by pen & paper or, much better, by putting data directly into the app. The app is available for downloading at WWW.DISCOVERNATURE.ORG.KG (Android version only). So, if you are planning to bring your personal Android smartphone, please consider downloading the app (how we will recharge all the phones in the absence of a convenient power plug is another matter ;). We will also be collecting data on birds that will contribute to creating a similar ‘Birds of Kyrgyzstan’ app in due course. Of course you will be trained on all of this during the introduction and training day!

That’s it for now. Once Phil and I have arrived in Bishkek we’ll be in touch again with our local phone numbers and some more updates from the ground.

Best wishes

Malika Fettak

Expedition leader

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